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Has EA just broken Fifa Ultimate Team?
Has EA just broken Fifa Ultimate Team?

There is trouble on the virtual terraces of the best-selling Fifa video game series. Fans have reacted with fury to changes announced by developer EA Sports, which will radically alter the game’s popular Ultimate Team feature.usdplayer FIFA Coins For many, the eBay-style open-auction transfer market that underpinned the mode’s gameplay – which involves building a “deck” of player trading cards into a fantasy team – was one of its biggest pulls. Bagging an in-form player at a bargain price, usually by purchasing their card at 2am when fewer participants are online, led to moments of punch-the-air euphoria. With some Harry-Redknapp-style wheeler and dealing the purchase could be immediately flipped back onto the market with a higher starting price – a much faster way of acquiring in-game currency than actually playing matches. And the faster you made coins, the quicker the world’s best players could be secured for your fantasy line-up. However, many within the millions-strong Fifa community believe EA’s prime motivation for the change is in its third explanation: “to further restrict illegitimate coin transfers on the transfer market”. Many players sell in-game currency via auction sites like eBay, breaking EA’s rules. However, the move effectively eliminates the tense, but legitimate, “player-flipping” gameplay many enjoyed. Now, the only means of improving a team is either to plough hours into playing matches, or invest real money in Fifa Points, which can then be turned into currency within the game.cheap fifa 14 coins The transaction behind illegitimate coin pruchases is relatively simple. A Fifa purchaser could amass 5,000,000 FIFA coins through clever manipulation of the transfer market over an extended period. The player could then agree to sell the haul to an online purchaser for £19.99. The purchaser sends the agreed sum via Paypal for “unspecified goods and services”, and then lists a FUT card with next-to-no-value – a League Two team’s away kit, for instance – on the in-game market for a Buy It Now price of £5,000,000. The rest of the world scoffs at such ridiculous pricing for something near worthless, leaving it free for the coin-seller to purchase. The two-way transaction is complete. And EA hasn’t seen a dime. Now consider that hundreds of such transactions are occurring on a daily basis, and it’s easy to understand why the company has a real problem on its hands, and was forced to take some action to block the scenario once and for all. It’s nonetheless fair to wonder whether EA has gone too far in the opposite direction. Would retaining the auction system with an upper, but not lower, limit for each card not have achieved an identical result? The upside lost on critics of this move is that many cards have come down in price since the switch was made, exactly as promised. For instance, any Crystal Palace fans biding their time to purchase an in-form Yannick Bolasie card may have been unable to stretch to the 90-100,000 coins he’s been selling for over the last month or so. Now he’s suddenly much more affordable, ranging between 17-25,000 coins. That great news for new purchasers, but less wonderful for Palace fans who may have purchased the card last week when it was going for around 86,000 coins.Cheapest FIFA 15 Coins