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FIFA 15 Is Really Broken On Mobile
FIFA 15 Is Really Broken On Mobile

Buy Cheap FIFA Coins From Mmonb.comFIFA is best known as a console and PC game, but EA’s hit soccer franchise has had a dedicated mobile audience for years now too. Some fans have had a hard time enjoying FIFA 15 Ultimate Team since it arrived last month for iOS and Android devices, however, because it’s been marred by technical issues. Like its predecessor FIFA 14, the new game has been well-received by fans and critics at mobile-centric sites like Touch Arcade and Pocket Gamer. But as is too often the case for sports games like this, the actual high quality gameplay has been overshadowed for some players by their inability to access it in the first place. Judging from player reviews posted on the iOS app store and Android’s Google Play store as well as comments posted on various gaming forums including EA’s own channels, mobile FIFA fans have run into a number of performance issues when trying to play the new Ultimate Team. While the specifics are diverse, a core problem is with the stability of the game and its servers — something that affects people’s ability to access different parts of the game (or access the game entirely), link it successfully to their Facebook accounts, and retain progress and in-game currency they have acquired. One particularly frustrating FIFA issue experienced by some, including Deadspin’s Tim Burke, cuts off players’ connections right at the end of a match, thereby failing to register the match’s successful completion.fifa 15 coins This has wider ramifications for the game because, like many popular mobile titles, FIFA 15 Ultimate Team has microtransactions and in-game currency. It’s also a sports management game, which means that an important aspect of its gameplay that players sink a lot of time and energy into is building a team full of their preferred players. To build and maintain a team, you have to spend either coins or “FIFA points,” the two types of in-game currency. Points are the one type of in-game currency that can be purchased with real money: $0.99 for 100 points, $2.99 for 300, all the way up to $99 for 10,000. These two different types of currency are then used to acquire players by either purchasing packs of cards and hoping there are some good players inside (think drafting in Magic: The Gathering), or seeking out individual players on the game’s “transfer market.” Points are a much more valuable form of currency. It costs 700 FIFA points (a little less than $7.99) to buy a “gold pack”, the snazziest set of cards available on the game’s marketplace, for instance, while the same pack would run you 35,000 coins. Money isn’t just required to get players, either: you also need to spend coins to maintain the “contract” you have with any given player every time you put them out on the field. These contracts vary in price depending on the skill level and ranking of the player. The best way to earn coins, meanwhile, is by successfully completing matches or selling off players. Burke explained to me that he can usually get 500 coins for completing a match at this point. The last two players he sold off got him 200 and 150 coins respectively. The cost of the requisite contracts to deploy players can, ideally, be offset by the coins earned at the end of a match. But if you don’t manage your team effectively and deploy too many high-level players, you could very well end up coming up short at the end of a match. http://www.mmonb.com/FIFA-16-Coins/ If all of this sounds exceedingly complicated, that’s because it is. There’s a reason that FIFA fans glom on to this game the same way they do with the console releases: it’s a complex sports simulation game that requires tactful planning, high level strategy, and constant management of resources to master. And that’s if everything works properly. If the game drops out right before a match is finished, that means that you lose any opportunity to gain currency back after being required to invest it just to start the match.